The Eurostar 2012 diaries (the prequel)

What a year…

It has been a while since my last blog post, and being the programme chair for Europe’s biggest software testing conference probably had something to do with that. Now that the twentieth edition of Eurostar is over and the whole event is still very much in my system, I figured it is about time to revive Ye Olde TestSideStory blog.

The Eurostar office, Galway

The whole year leading up to this moment was one big trip into testing conference wonderland. I learned loads about conference-making (I’m pretending that this is a dictionary entry somewhere) in the small and the large. Selecting a committee, a theme, keynotes, tutorials, assembling a balanced programme out of 400+ submissions – these things in itself already were quite a challenge. This, combined with a steady flow of related side-activities proved to occupy the better part of my free time. Luckily, the Eurostar team in Galway (Ireland) made this into a very enjoyable and fluent experience. I had the privilige of visiting the Galway office a couple of times in the past year, and the team has a great energy that gets things going (and a love for Belgian chocolates and all things Guinness). Props to my employer CTG as well, for giving me the opportunity to spend time preparing the conference.

Working with my committee (Julian Harty James LyndsayShmuel Gershon) throughout the year was certainly a highlight. I have fond memories of our lengthy skype sessions, discussing about anything in the testing conference realm – we even managed to find some emerging behavior in skype chat in the process. In hindsight, I was particularly impressed with Julian’s pragmatism and fresh ideas, James’ note-taking fu in the face of a truckload of submissions, and Shmuel’s contagious enthusiasm.

The last weeks, pressure had been building gradually: seeing the early bird subscriptions take off, hearing about testlab preparations, tutorials filling up… Later on, a couple of speakers opted out and needed replacement – things were getting more real every week.

Rainy Amsterdam – Sunday November 4

After some uneventful aquaplaning all the way from Belgium, I met up with Israeli-Brazilian superstar (and programme committee member extraordinaire) Shmuel Gershon. Originally there was a visit planned to the RAI to get acquainted with the venue layout, but since Eurostar happened to coincide with Shrek The musical (Ogres in the main auditorium! Fionas mindmapping a test strategy!), this was no longer possible. We decided to dive headfirst into the city of Amsterdam, to explore. Some observations:

  • A couple of hours in Amsterdam can spawn more rain than six days in Ireland
  • Torrential rain will soak up even the sturdiest shoes
  • The Anne Frank house has bigger lines than the newly opened Amsterdam Apple Store
  • From now on, if the map and the territory disagree, I’m believing the territory
  • Serendipitous wandering can make you end up in one of the finer Indian Restaurants in Amsterdam
  • The finer Indian bread is very kosher – but expensive
  • Two men with identical bright blue Novotel umbrellas look funny (I guess people expected a Gene Kelly dance routine)

When arriving back at the Novotel, soaked to the bone, a bunch of testers had already gathered for an informal meetup in the bar. I was planning to change into dry clothes first, but got engaged in conversation and totally forgot about it. Sometimes you have to plan as you go along.

Conference pre-opening (photo by Huib Schoots)

While my shoes were drying slowly, I spent the rest of the evening chatting with new friends (Cyril Boucher, Jeanne Peng, Erkki Pöyhönen) and catching up with old ones (John Stevenson, Michael Bolton, Huib Schoots, Jean-Paul Varwijk, Rikard Edgren, Shmuel). John in particular was on fire that evening, quoting book titles like some kind of human reading tip generator. The two that I managed to note down are “The click moment” and “Everything is obvious“. The rest got lost in a pre-conference haze.

Later on I ran into the Eurostar crew as well. They had been on site since friday, unpacking stuff and basically building everything from scratch. They expanded their team for the conference, and it was nice meeting new faces there too. They all looked happy and confident, which was kind of reassuring to see: the logistic side is under control. Chatting with them also made me realize that things were about to be kicked off for real.

Are those nerves I feel? Anyway, time for bed – appointment at the RAI at 7 am.

… to be continued

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Keith Klain – Bridging the Gap: Leading change in a community of testers

I am at StarEast this week, and originally intended to give live-blogging a go, an art perfected by the ubiquitous Markus Gaertner. Alas, the wireless connection decided otherwise, so I am a bit on the late side with this. Here is a summary of the opening keynote of the StarEast conference, by Keith Klane: Bridging the Gap: Leading change in a community of testers.

In this presentation, Keith Klain described how Barclay’s Capital Global Test Center (GTC) managed to totally change the way they worked. The GTC is an independent testing service providing full lifecycle software testing support and specialist testing services across multiple businesses from 6 global locations.

Keith got triggered by something his boss had told him: to go reflect on a a couple of things, stating “In this business you’re either a bug or a windshield”. This made Keith wonder: what is motivating people? You cannot make people do anything unless they want to do it because it is in their best interest. That is real leadership.

On a leadership summit in Europe last year, Keith heard all sorts of depressing things: that testers don’t understand the business, that they are too slow and too expensive, that all testing should be automated. So clearly all these years of maturity models, metrics programmes, certifications, process improvements are not getting through, they’re not working.

Values

It is important to outline what your values are:

– Honesty, with ourselves and others. Be transparent about strengths and weaknesses.

– Integrity: earn the right to have an opinion. Provide clear and constant feedback.

– Accountability: Own it. Understand what “value” means in your business. Manage your own expectations.

The situation

When Keith arrived at the GTC, an improvement programme was already in place and ongoing, called “change programme phase 1”.

  • There were test maturity models and maturity improvement plans, based on industry standards. He decided to kill that.
  • There was a metrics programme, a test case efficiency model centered on test execution. It consisted of automation metrics based on test case coverage and program tracking sheets. They noticed that as soon as you want to put a number on something people are doing, people start focusing on the number, and not on the thing they’re supposed to do. He decided to kill the programme.
  • There was a career framework. The focus of test managempent was on operational control and team size. He killed that too.

Talent management

From that momentb on, the GTC started focusing on Talent Management. The keywords here: attract/develop/retain.

Attract

They raised the hiring (and existing employee) bar and transferred quality ownership to the team. They made sure that GTC was viewed as a “Top Project”, very hard to get in (in analogy with Google).

Develop

Keith invited James Bach to come and teach his Rapid Software Testing course and regularly provide consulting as well. On top of that, they improved business and testing skills. After a while, people started developing their own training courses, around ten in total. These were staff-led without any steering from management. They also started a new test management mentoring programme.

Retain

They flattened out the career framework, until it contained only four levels. They developed Induction Programmes, in which they told people what was expected from them. In addition, Keith told them what was to be expected from him.

Management principles

  • People start ignoring testing when it’s no longer relevant. It’s your own fault if people start ignoring you. Speak the language of your programs, learn what the values are and people will listen to you.
  • Being responsible sometimes means rocking the boat. Sometimes people will have to tell someone that something is not done well. That is no problem, as long as it’s done respectfully. “If you want a friend, buy a dog”.
  • No one has the market cornered on good ideas. Bill Gates once said that even the smartest people in the world only had one good idea in their whole life. New ideas are all around you, look around. Solve problems collectively.
  • Never stop asking why. It is a powerful and clarifying question that will get you where you want to. Question everything. Don’t mindlessly go about your job.
  • Invest 80% of your energy in your top 20%.
  • Leadership = simplification. The problem is that people cannot communicate simply about their solution. Tell something in a way that people do something about it. That is something that goes beyond an elevator pitch.
  • Don’t take it personally. You are not your ideas. These depend on a whole series of factors. If you take things too personally, you won’t be able to change your behavior
  • Think first, then do.

The Results

  • General investments in the GTC have gone up. This shows the importance that management started giving to the GTC.
  • Nonsense management overhead was removed, and all of a sudden loads of new talent started bubbling up. People got rewarded for their efforts on their test strategies, their approaches, their ideas. (“Runner up” CIO award).
  • The biggest improvement or cultural change was the GTC university. It was all there: class room training, brown bag sessions, mentoring, competitions, all done off the back, not steered by management.
  • Leading cultural change = a paradigm shift

Stop

Pretending that the value of your testing org is anyone other’s responsibility, and pretending that you’re going to” mature out” of that position

Start

Telling people what you expect from them. Support them by a training regime that helps them do that. Create an environment where people are not afraid to fail. Create a learning organization.

Continue

Driving out fear of failure by creating an environment that enables innovation and rewards collaboration through strategic objectives and constant feedback.

I really liked this keynote. It was an inspiring story that showed how you *can* make a difference when you start focusing on skill and building a learning organization.

Innovate & Renovate: Evolving Testing

Test Side Sorry

I know it’s been quiet here lately. A big Test Side Sorry for that. A lot has happened the last months, and many things occupy my mind and time.

Eurostar 2011

One of these is Eurostar, Europe’s largest testing conference which took place in Manchester in november. I had a great time meeting new people and catching up with others. Finally meeting people from twitter in person is one of the best side-effects from conferences I know. It feels like meeting old acquaintances, in a way. 

The test lab vibe was great, as always. I saw some great track sessions, and there were loads of things happening behind the scenes as well: video tapings, special and fun sessions that will be published the coming months. I even spotted a smoke machine or two on a Thin Lizzy soundtrack. The conferring didn’t stop at 6 pm – Manchester pubs were test-infected for a while.

At the gala awards dinner, in the magnificent setting of the Manchester Monastery, Julian Harty received the Testing Excellence award. Geoff Thompson also revealed next year’s programme chair.

Eurostar 2012

Rewind three weeks. Lorraine – Eurostar’s conference manager – calls me during my daily commute to inquire if I would be interested in becoming the programme chair for 2012. I barely manage to steer clear of a ditch. And I apologize to that old lady I almost ran into. Back to the call. I hesitate at first, ask some time to think it through. Seconds later I realize: “wait a minute, what was I thinking? Of course I’ll do it! Yes, there will be work involved. But it’s all good.

Eurostar will turn twenty in november 2012. I will be the host of this special edition, taking place from november 5-8 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Twenty years, that is quite something. No longer a teenager, and old enough to party.

My partners in crime for this conference are James Lyndsay, Julian Harty and Shmuel Gershon, and I can’t stress enough how honored I feel that they accepted to be on the team. Our first task was to come up with a theme. Since our aim is to craft a learning conference, focusing on innovation, renovation and creativity in testing, we decided on:

Innovate & Renovate: Evolving Testing

The call for submissions is now open, by the way. I look forward to receiving your ideas.

Home Swede Home – Øredev 2011

Last week I attended (and presented at) the Øredev conference in Malmö. Sigge Birgisson invited me to be part of a fully Context-driven test track, which I gratefully accepted. It turned out to be quite a memorable experience. Øredev was the first ever *developer* conference (be it with a testing twist) I attended, which gave the event a totally different vibe for me. Cosy, laid back and open-minded. Geeky too, in a good way:  they provided a cool conference app with a puzzle that could only be solved by obtaining other people’s codes. The side effect of that was that random people started addressing me with “Hi. Can I have your code?” moments before bolting off in their own space-time continuum. Speed dating for techies.

Another thing that really stood out were the graphic live-recordings by Heather and Nora from Imagethink. These talented ladies recorded every keynote live on stage, and made the beautifully looking artworks available as handouts later on. A brilliant idea.

As for the proceedings of the conference – here are some personal highlights:

Day 1

Day 1 had no real testing track, but there was enough fun to be had in other areas of the development spectrum. As the conference was centered around “the user” (Enter Userverse), it kicked off with “Only your mom wants to use your website”, an entertaining keynote by Alexis Ohanian, of Reddit and Hipmunk fame. Hey, the guy even spoke at TED about a whale called Mister Splashy Pants – top that! This time he told a compelling story about how the secret behind succesful websites is caring for your users. He told us that generally, the bar on websites is raised so low that it is really easy to stand out if you’re able to delight your user.

In “Collaboration by better understanding yourself”, Pat Kua stated that people have lots of in built reactions that hold us back from collaborating more effectively: power distance, physical distance, titles, even clothes. What could help us? Awareness, feedback, breaking the cycle, XP practices, courage. A good talk with good content, and some good book recommendations as well.

Johanna Rothman managed to keep me engaged for her whole talk about “Managing for collaboration”. She talked about how to manage the entire system for success, and how we should optimize and collaborate on the highest level, solving problems for the entire organization, not the project. I had the privilige of getting to know Johanna in her may 2011 PSL (Problem Solving Leadership) class, which she organizes together with Esther Derby and Jerry Weinberg. I knew she was a great storyteller, and she did not let us down: one gem was how she upset management by donating her entire bonus to her team and letting them decide who got what. 

Neal Ford closed off the day conference with “Abstraction distractions”, in which he dissected abstractions that have become so common that we started mistaking them for the real thing. An abstraction is a simplification of something much more complicated that is going on under the covers. As it turns out, a lot of computer programming consists of building abstractions. A file system, for instance, is a way to pretend that a hard drive isn’t really a bunch of spinning magnetic platters that can store bits at certain locations, but rather a hierarchical system of folders. And what’s that icon on a save button again? A floppy what? In addition, we shouldn’t name things that expose the underlying details. Users really don’t want save buttons, they just want their stuff to be saved. He also quoted Joel Spolsky’s Law of Leaky Abstractions: All non-trivial abstractions, to some degree, are leaky.

The day ended with drinks, dinner and some live jazz. I ended up talking testing (among other things) with Pradeep Soundarajan over dinner, when suddenly a late night evening session was announced: Copenhagen Suborbitals. At that moment, it reeked of a mediocre techno-act from the late nineties and I didn’t really feel like joining in. But Pradeep was curious enough and I decided to tag along. 

Flash forward one hour. Pradeep and I were literally blown away by a passionate tale of two Danes with a dream to build and launch their own manned rocket into space. Peter Madsen told a compelling and inspiring story about dreams, constraints, possibilities, enthusiasm, courage and rocket fuel.

Day 2

Day two was kicked off by Dan North who talked about “embracing uncertainty”. Fear – he said – leads to risk, risk leads to process, process leads to hate… and suffering and Gantt charts. Dan stressed that people would rather be wrong than uncertain, and that adding more process in times of uncertainty is wasteful and counter-productive. He also contrasted the original intentions of the agile manifesto in 2001, and what has become of that now. He stated that our ability to survive is directly related to handling the unexpected. We should embrace uncertainty, expect the unexpected and anticipate ignorance.

I decided to put up my basecamp in the “Test” room today, since this was context-driven testing day: six testing tracks covering a wide variety of topics. The only drawback was that the room looked like it was designed by an architect on acid: unfinished, an enigmatic door way up high in a wall, bare cables and sockets and a very short and high stage that forced you either to stand in front of the projection screen or to stay cemented in the same spot the whole time. Sound isolation was kind of peculiar too, although that only seemed to be  a problem when Americans were presenting nextdoors. But I’m nitpicking here: the whole Slagthuset venue was nice, and organization and technical team were super helpful, the whole day.

Pradeep Soundararajan‘s talk was titled “How I wish users knew how I help them through context driven testing”. Pradeep started by pointing out that he had the shortest abstract and the longest bio in the conference booklet. True. He seems to like long titles for his talks, too. In combination with his name, this probably makes him a nightmare to introduce at conferences. But in contrast with the title, his talk was short, crisp and funny. He was brave enough to do some live-demoing of his twitter-driven exploratory testing approach: looking for user feedback by searching in tweets with negative emoticons and profanities combined with the product or website name. I hadn’t read his blogpost before now, and it made me laugh out loud. I love the smell of profanities in the morning. Brilliant idea, that.

Next up was Shmuel Gershon, who shared an experience report of a 100% exploratory testing project, “Case Study on Team Leadership with Context-Driven Exploratory Tests”. He came well-prepared, all set to win our hearts with charisma, handouts and chocolats. He told us about how he took his team on a journey towards more context-driven testing and how he dealt with that as his role was also changing. He told us a story on test management, session based testing, recruiting even. He urged us to let people tell their stories, don’t start asking why, leaving them feeling that they have to justify themselves.

The ubiquitous Gojko Adzic (I suspect there are several clones making the rounds of conferences worldwide. Where /doesn’t/ he speak?) was his energetic self in his graveyard shift session called “Sleeping with the enemy”. Independent testing, he said, should be a thing from the past. Testers should engage with developers and business users, in order to create opportunities to accomplish things they cannot do otherwise. I like Gojko’s style, always direct and uncompromising, but always thoughtful. After Gojko’s presentation, a heated hallway discussion ensued in the so-called chalk-talk area. This embodies what conferences are all about: conferring. 

With “Diversity in team composition”, Henrik Andersson took the small stage trying to convince us that when assembling good teams, diversity rocks and uniformity, well, not so much. With some simple examples (“can I please ask everyone wearing black clothes to stand up. You are now a team”), he showed us that there’s much more to it than randomly throwing some people together.

Then it was Selena Delesie‘s turn to shine in the beamer lights. In “Focusing Testing on Business Needs”, she explained how to focus the testing effort on customer needs. She asked some pertinent questions; Are you valued in your team? How do you know?

The last presentation slot of the day in the testing track was for yours truly. In Artful Testing, I talked about how I think testing can benefit from the arts. From thoughtfully looking at it, to develop our thinking. From critical theory and the tools used by art critics, to become software critics. From artists, and how they look at the world – through artist personas). I also touched on the importance of context in evaluating art and software. I received some great reactions and feedback afterwards, and some good tips from Pradeep and Rikard as well.

After that, there was dinner, drinks and Øredev Open, where Pradeep was invited to present “The next generation software tester”. In theory. But you know how these things go. In theory, theory and practice are the same; in practice they are not: dinner took a bit longer than expected, drinks were abundant and so it happened that Pradeep took the stage for some Beer-Driven Exploratory Presenting. It was a great stand-up routine.

Ola Hylten joined in and Shmuel decided to whip out his box with tester games and puzzles. Time for some serious thinking, mixed with laughs. When the Øredev Open closed, we took ourselves and our silly games to the hotel bar where innocent passers-by quickened their pace.

Day 3

Day 3 in the test track started with “Agile testing: advanced topics” by Janet Gregory who highlighted five topics that had emerged since the release of “Agile Testing” by Lisa Crispin and herself. She mentioned feature acceptance (when you’re not able to deliver everything, focus on the features that matter), collaborative automation, large organizations, distributed teams, continuous learning.

Next up was my favorite Swedish philosopher (granted, I only know one), Rikard Edgren, who delivered did a spot-on and thought-provoking session called “Curing Our Binary Disease”. He stated that software testing is suffering from a binary disease: pass/fail addiction, coverage obsession, metrics tumor and sick test design techniques (sick as in “ill”, not “wicked” – my interpretation). Couldn’t agree more. He also mentioned his infamous “software potato”, which made for following legendary phrase: “A tester might not even know that he’s in the potato”. 

All this binary goodness got me thinking: Stay/Go? Focus/Defocus? Defocus it was. I chose to do a final round of the expo and do a quick Copenhagen visit to get some fresh air while it was still light out.

That concluded Øredev 2011. It was great to finally meet Selena, Sigge and Pradeep. And Robert Bergqvist as well. It was great catching up with others (Johanna, Shmuel, Henrik, Janet, David, Ola, Rikard,…). Next up: Eurostar in Manchester next week. A full-blooded tester conference that will rock as well. Let’s meet there.

What happened at DEWT1 doesn’t just stay at DEWT1 (June 11, 2011)

A report on the first DEWT (Dutch Exploratory Workshop on Testing) on May 11, 2011 in Driebergen, NL

What started on twitter in november last year, culminated in a first major milestone last weekend: DEWT1, our first peer – and Exploratory – Workshop on Testing (yes, the D is for Dutch, but these Dutchmen happily accepted this Belgian foreign element in their midst). Michael Bolton added to the international character by agreeing to be our special guest for the weekend.

It turned out to be an inspiring and fun event. Here’s my write-up.

The venue

Hotel Bergsebossen, Driebergen, NL

The participants

People on DEWT-y, from left to right:

Jeroen Rosink, Ray Oei, Jeanne Hofmans, Michel Kraaij, Huib Schoots, Jean-Paul Varwijk, Ruud Cox, Zeger Van Hese, Michael Bolton

Peter “Simon” Schrijver (who was roaming the earth the Better Software conference at the time)  and Anna Danchenko could not attend

The pre-conference

We gathered on friday night as a warm-up to the conference. When Michael Bolton is around, this usually means getting lured into some tricky testing puzzles, and some beers to ease the pain of messing up. And yes, jokes too. And Talisker. After we discovered the versatility of the average Dutch hotel bouncer (half bouncer, half God ad-hoc bartender), we called it a night. A dream-ridden night it was, filled with newly learned terms, such as…

Shanghai (transitive verb) \ˈshaŋ-ˌhī, shaŋ-ˈhī\ (shanghaied / shanghaiing)

1 a : to put aboard a ship by force often with the help of liquor or a drug b : to put by force or threat of force into or as if into a place of detention

2 : to put by trickery into an undesirable position

The conference

Artful Testing

Speaking of which… during our last preparatory DEWT-meet-up, my fellow DEWTees shanghaied me into doing the first talk of the day, which they promptly called a keynote to make it sound like an invitation. I thankfully accepted though, since I wanted to get some feedback on my work-in-progress presentation. The link between art and testing has been consuming me for more than half a year now. I premiered my ideas on it at the second Writing About Testing (WAT) conference in Durango last month (if you haven’t done it already, you should check-out the great WAT write-ups from Marlena Compton, Alan Page and Markus Gärtner).

Ruud (who facilitated the morning sessions) kicked off the conference and invited me to take the proverbial stage. Based on the feedback from WAT, I made some modifications to the presentation and put it out here again for a second time. I don’t know if the subject was really fit for an early morning session, but I received some gratifying feedback that convinced me to pursue my efforts in this direction.

Transpections

Transpections (basically a way of learning and sharpening your ideas by putting yourself in someone else’s place in some kind of Socratic dialog) were on our DEWT wish list for quite some time already. We had been reading all sorts of interesting stuff on it (see James Bach’s post here, some Michael Bolton posts here and here, and Stephen J. Hill’s post here), so we asked Michael Bolton if he would be willing to give us a quick roundup on the subject. Michael agreed and made it into an interactive session, inviting us to pair up to gather information about transpections and then transpect on that. Meta-transpection for the win!

The information gathering exercise was enlightening, and brought up some good food for thought. Michael compared a transpection session with the play between a hammer and an anvil, where the hammer would be the initiator of the transpection, the anvil the person whom the initiator is transpecting with, and the metal the idea being shaped.

In the end, we didn’t get to try an actual transpection session, partly because I artfully exceeded my allotted time in the previous session. Oh well…  It was a valuable exercise nonetheless.

Lightning talks

After lunch there were some lightning talks to fight the afternoon dip:

  • Jeroen got started about the hierarchic “testing pyramid” model (testers / test coordinators / test managers) and how he wants to challenge that classical view
  • Huib followed, on “the power of knowing nothing”, about how starting with a (mentally) clean slate reduces the chances of being biased. “It’s not about the what, it’s about the “why”
  • I touched upon the topic of the Baader Meinhof phenomenon and how testers could leverage the effect by absorbing as much knowledge as possible, on several subjects (a blog about that has been sitting in my drafts since january 2010 – I’ll try to finish that)

Introducing exploratory testing in Dutch projects

Ray then presented an experience report on how he was able to introduce exploratory testing and session based test management in classic, T-Map-style projects, using the principles he learned from Rapid Software Testing. Discussion ensued on how to prove the benefits of RST, and what the major differences between the approaches are. But we ended up talking mostly about “release advice”, and what to do when you’re asked to give it. One take-away phrase for me: “it’s not declining, it’s empowering the product manager”.

Walking break & Positive Deviance

Although we finished the previous topic way ahead of schedule, everyone felt like the last discussion drained our energy (our staying up late the night before probably didn’t help either). Jeanne, who facilitated the afternoon sessions, had the brilliant idea to just go out for a walk in the “Utrechtse Heuvelrug” national park, which turned out to be a conference session in its own right: relaxing, fun and informative. A beautiful spot, too. There was a moment where I thought we were getting lost, but here’s another lesson: do not underestimate the power of nine explorers, without a map.

Back at the hotel, Michael talked about positive deviance and positive deviants (people whose uncommon but successful behaviors or strategies enable them to find better solutions to a problem than their peers, despite having no special resources or knowledge). He also showed us a video of Jasper Palmer, a patient transporter at the Albert Einstein hospital (and a positive deviant) who became famous for his “Palmer Method”, which is now a standard life-saving practice in a number of hospitals. A mighty fascinating topic, that I’ll be exploring more for sure.

Credibility

Ruud delivered the closing presentation, on credibility – the quality of being trusted and believed. The main issues Ruud addressed were: how do we – testers – build credibility, and how do we manage to maintain it? After all, trust is built slowly, but destroyed in seconds. Simple questions, but a very complex subject indeed. “Trust” and “credibility” are relations: you can be credible to some person at a certain moment in time, but totally incredible to another. Trying to build your credibility is not always something controllable. Sure, you can do your very best to improve your credibility on a personal level, but you don’t really have an influence on how people will perceive you. Ruud then explained how he tries to build credibility. He impressed me with the personal mnemonic he developed, and the matching artwork as a personal reminder to stick to these principles:

STYLE

  • Safety language
  • Two ears one mouth
  • Yes but
  • Lighten up a little
  • Empathy
I’m not going in detail here, because I specifically want Ruud to finish that blog post he’s been mulling over for ages now. So, yes Ruud, the pressure is on. You’ve got some great material – time to share it with the world!

DEWT1 ended with drinks, testing games and dinner. I ended the day way more energized than I started it, which is always a good sign (silly extroverts like me get fueled by events like this). DEWT1 rocked. It was informal, informative and entertaining. When is the next?

Why you shouldn’t miss EuroSTAR 2010

10 reasons why you shouldn’t miss Eurostar 2010

Two weeks from now you will find me in trendy Copenhagen, proud home of the world’s best restaurant (Noma) and Hans Christian Andersen’s Little Mermaid. But the real reason for my trek up north is not sightseeing or spending money on Tørret kammusling og biodynamiske gryn: Copenhagen is also the host of the 18th edition of the annual EuroSTAR testing conference.

If you’re not yet familiar with Europe’s biggest software testing conference, you should definitely check them out. If you’re still hesitating about attending, there’s no need to. If you’re thinking of going, do go. Here’s why:

  • First and foremost: the Content.
    • The programme committee assembled a promising line-up, centered around the main theme “sharing the passion”. Track session categories include test management, exploratory testing, virtualisation, techniques, Scrum, inspiration, education, Lean, MBT, people and automation, among many others. L’embarras du choix.
    • Keynotes, anyone? Antony Marcano, Rob Sabourin, Bob Galen, Dino Patti and Stuart Reid. Recent history teaches us that wherever Stuart lays his hat, controversy and discussion automagically appear. I’m confident that his keynote “When Passion Obscures The Facts: The Case for Evidence-Based Testing” will be no different. 
    • I especially look forward to the tutorials. Rob Sabourin will run a full-day tutorial on “Just In Time Testing – Effective Testing Strategies“. Michael Bolton will be doing a half-day tutorial on Test Framing (read his blogpost that coins test framing here). But that’s not all. There’s Lee Copeland too. And many, many more. L’embarras du choix, revisité.   
  • Test Lab.
    James Lyndsay and Bart Knaack will run their on-site Test Lab for the second consecutive year. They will be assisted by Henrik Emilsson and Martin Jansson, 2/3 of that restless online blogging collective called The Test Eye. The other 1/3 is Rikard Edgren, who is part of the programme committee this year – I guess you could say that Eurostar is TestEye-infected. From what I experienced last year, the test lab is a really unique experience. Live testing at a testing conference! Theory put into practice, and maybe some weekend testing sessions, testing dojos or katas. Anything goes, really.
  • Inspiration.
    Hearing all these different viewpoints, new ideas, talking with the experts, engaging in discussions… It’s a savory buffet full of food for thought. Attending conferences is intellectually stimulating, and you’ll probably learn more during these couple of days than you do during most ‘regular’ training courses. I see EuroSTAR as a multi-dimensional training course that as such deserves to be on every company’s training calendar.
  • Get Primed.
    Any problems you are facing at work – you just might see them differently when you get back. Things you hear at the conference and  people you talk to often trigger other ways of thinking. Conferences tend to broaden your perspective on things.
  • Reach out to the testing community.
    This year’s theme is ‘Sharing the passion’, which should make it easy to meet like-minded people who share the same interests. In his 2009 book “The Element”, Ken Robinson calls this “finding your tribe”: connecting with people who share the same passions and commitment (your “tribe”) helps in finding and developing your “element” (which is the place where passion and skill meet). Members of a passionate community tend to stimulate each other to explore the real extent of their talents. Whenever tribes gather in the same place, the opportunities for mutual inspiration can become intense.
  • Meet Testing Tweeps.
    Twitter has been doing brilliant things for testers already, community-wise. It’s a great way to interact with testers worldwide on a daily basis. It has also proven to be a very useful, fun and informative way to cover conferences, especially for the people missing out (watch that #esconfs hashtag for some conference goodness). If you’re on twitter, EuroSTAR will also be a good opportunity to meet numerous testing tweeps in person and to take your twitter-conversations with them to the next level.
  • Hallway/Bar discussions.
    In an earlier blog post, C is for Conferring, I mentioned that conferences are for conferring, and that the most interesting things often happen in the hallways, in between sessions. Or in the bar. Or somewhere totally unexpected. Make sure there are blank spots in your busy schedule to invite serendipity.
  • One word: Copenhagen.
    ‘Nuff said. But did I mention that the place of action is the Bella center? Last year, the Bella center hosted the first sustainable, international political summit – the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP15) – attracting over 33,000 people. No worries, Eurostar Conferences assured me that Eurostar 2010 will be more succesful than its flunked climatic counterpart.
  • Interactive Panel Session.
    On wednesday morning, Lee Copeland will facilitate a Hot Topics Panel Session. The expert panel is there to address *your* burning issues, so if you want to ask the EuroSTAR Panel a question, you can do so via facebook. Yes, the Social Network goes testing.
  • It’s fun!
    By focusing on all the content, the learning and networking, I almost forgot to mention that above all, it’s fun. All of the above takes place in a fun and relaxed athmosphere.Fun sessions for the weary testers are foreseen as well (I’ve been told that the supertesters are something to look out for).

This concludes *my* list. Rob Lambert wrote about attending EuroSTAR too, in his post EuroSTAR will rock. Eurostar Conferences has also listed their Top 10 Reasons To Attend EuroSTAR 2010! And if you need to make a case for attending the conference, the 10 ways to convince your boss to send you to EuroSTAR 2010 article may be able to help you with that.

I hope to see you in Copenhagen. I’m @TestSideStory, by the way. I’ll be roaming the hallways – feel free to come and talk to me. I’ll be the one with that thorny rose clenched in the teeth.

Short service announcement: tomorrow, October 16, programme committee member Peter Morgan will present a webinar especially for first time attendees. It is called “Getting The Most Out Of EuroSTAR“. More info and a link to register for the webinar can be found here.

Agile Testing Days 2010 – Day 3 (Lederhosen and Certified Self-Certifiers)

Agile Testing Days 2010 – Day 3 (Lederhosen and Certified Self-Certifiers)

October 6

Wednesday. Michael Bolton warmed up the audience with the keynote performance How am I supposed to live without you?Testers: Get Out of the Quality Assurance Business!“, and proved once again that he’s a hard act to follow. He immediately came out of the closet saying that he’s an Agile skeptic and stated what “being Agile” means to him:

  • Adhering to the Agile Manifesto
  • “Be able to move quickly and easily” (cf the definition in the Oxford English Dictionary)
  • De-emphasizing testing for repeatability
  • Re-emphasizing testing for adaptability
  • For testers, focusing on testing skills
  • Focusing on not being fooled

Michael then defined quality as “Value to some person(s) who matter” (© Weinberg, Bach, Bolton) and said that decisions about quality are always political and emotional, and taken by people who actually have the power to make these important decisions. A little bit later, the main message of the talk jumped right at us and bit us in the face:

If you are a tester, do *you* hire the programmers? Fix problems in the code? Design the product? Allocate staff? Set the company’s strategic direction? Allocate training budgets? Set the schedule? Decide on raises? Control the budget in any way? Negotiate customer contracts? Actually choose the development model? Set the product scope? Do you decide which bugs to fix, or write the code yourself?

Did you answer “No” to most of them? Then you will probably agree that it is simply impossible to “assure” quality. But no worries – it is not our job to assure quality. What we *can* do is test, and make sure we’re damn good at it. Testing in the sense of a sapient activity, providing information with the intent of *informing* a decision, not *taking* the decision. Not to be confused with checking, which mainly aims at confirming existing beliefs. Checking is automatable and non-sapient.

Michael Bolton shifted into a higher gear, and claimed that “acceptance tests” are examples, and that examples aren’t really tests. They are checks, not tests. Acceptance tests don’t tell us when we’re done, but they do tell us that we’re not finished when they fail. They should in fact be called “rejection checks”.

I looked around me. Usually, at this point in a presentation and at this time of day, people are dozing off. Even the biggest barflies were wide awake now. He ended with a set of statements that almost read like some kind of Tester’s Manifesto:

We’re not here to enforce The Law.
We are neither judge nor jury.
We’re here to add value, not collect taxes.
We’re here to be a service to the project, not an obstacle. 

I got out of the room early and skipped the Q&A part, since my presentation was up next. Apparently the Q&A got a bit out of hand (I suspect the A was probably more to blame than the Q), because the auditorium doors swung open 15 minutes late. In hindsight, I was lucky that I even had an audience; in a parallel track, Gojko Adzic was delivering one hell of a performance (a stand-up comedy routine, I was told) for an overly packed room. 

No stand-up comedy in my room, but an honest “inexperience report” called “A lucky shot at Agile?“. I had ditched Powerpoint one week earlier and decided to go for Prezi, the so much nicer alternative. Of course, this was a bit of a risk, but I think it turned out fine. The presentation went well, and I received some good and heartwarming feedback which really made the rest of my day. 

In case you are interested, here’s A lucky shot at agile – prezi.

<Shameless_plug>In case you’re interested in the full story, Eurostar conferences has released my paper on the subject in an ebook-format – available for free – here </Shameless_plug>

I stayed in the room to attend Anko Tijman‘s talk “Mitigating Agile Testing Pitfalls“. Anko’s talk revolved around five pitfalls that threaten agile teams, and what we can do to mitigate them:

  1. Not testing with the customer. We can mitigate this risk by building a relationship, building trust.
  2. Not testing as a team. Teams are collectively responsible for the quality of the product. Share knowledge not only with your testers, but with the whole team. Work on a collaborative definition of done, tackle risks.
  3. Unbalanced test strategy. Teams sometimes focus too much on unit tests or acceptance tests, postpone other test activities to the next phase. This in turn can lead to a lack of feedback. To overcome this, put more detail in Definition of Done, schedule knowledge sessions, share content on a wiki.
  4. Requirements are too vague/ambiguous. Collaboration is the key in overcoming this pitfall. Communicate!
  5. Tools. Focus only on tools that add value to the team and that support the practices of the team. Decide as a team which tools to use and which not.

By then it was time for lunch, which is always a good occasion to mingle with other testers, discuss and have some fun. And to ravage that German buffet, of course. I had the impression that everyone was eagerly anticipating the keynote that would follow, which was Stuart Reid with “Agile Testing Certification – How Could That Be Useful“. It became clear that he wasn’t exactly going to preach for his own parish.

And a controversial talk it was. Twitter servers were moaning as Stuart’s quotes and graphic interpretations thereof were launched into #AgileTD cyberspace. Strangely enough, the infamous twitter fail whale was nowhere to be seen, which surprised me since the whole auditorium was filled with bug magnets. Stuart Reid started off by stating that it is only a matter of time before a qualification for agile testing is proposed and launched, whether we like it or not. He continued to say that if we want our industry as a whole to improve, we should exert our influence to help create a certification scheme we can truly benefit from. Fair enough. But what followed next confused me.

Stuart Reid stated that “the certification genie is out of the bottle” – what started as a good intention has spiralled out of control, and there’s no way back. This sounded like nothing more than a public dismissal of ISTQB to me, coming from one of the founding fathers. He proceeded to give an overview of the typical money flows in such a certification scheme, which was pretty enlightening. At one point, Stuart even managed to upset Elisabeth Hendrickson by stating that “it’s not because you are teaching Agile, that the training itself has to be Agile”. The movie clip of that very moment will live long and prosper on the internet. The whole “if you can’t beat them, join them”-idea bothered me too, as if there are no alternatives. Instead of focusing on certifications, we could try to educate employers, starting right at the top level. Certification programs exist mainly because employers don’t really know what qualities define a good tester. For them, a certification is merely a tool to quickly filter incoming resumes. Anyway, I think it’s good that Stuart initiated the debate, which would continue the rest of the conference.

The room was buzzing afterwards. Nothing better than some good old controversy to get the afternoon started. David Evans calmed things down again with “Hitting a Moving Target – Fixing Quality on Unfixed Scope“. He had some great visuals to support a thoughtful story. Some heavily tweeted quotes here:

  • QA in Agile shouldn’t be Quality Assurance but rather Questions and Answers
  • The product of testing is confidence (to which Michael Bolton quickly added that the product of testing is actually the demolition of false confidence).
  • Acceptance Test Driven Development (ATDD) slows down development just as passengers slow down a bus. We should measure the right thing.

Then it was Markus Gärtner‘s moment to shine in the spotlights. He presented “Alternative Paths for Self-Education in Software Testing“. During the last year, I got to know Markus as a passionate professional, dedicated to learning and advancing the craft. An overly active and ever-blogging guy that may have found the secret of the 27-hour-day. He opened with the question “who is in charge of your career?” Is it your boss? Your employer? Your family? Your teachers from high school? Well, none of that. It’s YOU. If you find yourself unemployed a year from now, everything you do now is contributing to you being employed quickly again.

Markus listed several ways of learning and self-improvement:

  • Books:
  • Courses
  • Buccaneer Scholaring, a way of taking your education in your own hands, based on the book Secrets of a Buccaneer Scholar by James Bach
  • Testing challenges – challenges to and by the Testing Community
  • Testing Dojos – principles: collaboration in a safe environment, deliberate practice. Usually consists of a mission which allows the testers to practice their testing and learning. Can happen with observers or facilitators, can be a good occasion to practice pair testing too.
  • Weekend Testing – A few hours of testing + debriefing in the weekend  according to a charter or a mission. I participated in a couple of European weekend sessions, and I must say: great learnings indeed. 
  • The Miagi-Do School of Software Testing, a school founded by software craftsman Matt Heusser. It’s a zero profit school where people can improve their skills, learn from others and share knowledge, using a belt system like in martial arts. They are not widely advertised – as Markus said: the first challenge is finding them.  

Janet Gregory‘s closing keynote fitted nicely in Markus’ theme, since it was all “About Learning“. It was an inspiring talk, about congruence in learning, the importance of learning, the curiosity of children – how their unspoiled curiosity makes them natural testers. She also related the learning to the agile principles. She managed to tie in neatly with Rob Lamberts presentation about structures and creativity. A safe environment helps you to learn. She referred to trust as an important element in team safety. A blame culture will work counterproductive. No-one will learn anything.

After all this theory about learning, we were all yearning for some hands-on practice. The Diaz & Hilterscheid gang gave us the opportunity to practice that typically German custom called Oktoberfest. Just like last year, they dressed up in Lederhosen (I’m actually getting used to the look of José in Lederhosen, go figure) and started serving plenty of local food and one-liter glasses of beer. There was live music as well, which added to a fun Bayerisches athmosphere. The evening culminated in some vivid discussions of the burning issues of the day. Well, actually there was only one burning issue: certification. Elisabeth Hendrickson was determined to get everyone mobilised for a worthy cause and whipped out her iPad on which she had written some kind of self-certification manifesto. Someone threw a pile of index cards on the table. Elisabeth was on fire and started handing them out everywhere. “If you agree with it, copy it. If you don’t, don’t”. Index cards on tables. Pens. Beer. Lots of people copying index card after index card till their fingers went in a cramp. That night witnessed the birth of a community of certified self-certifyers, all of them proudly carrying the message:

We are a community of professionals.
We are dedicated to our own continuing education
and take responsibility for our careers.
We support advancing in learning and advancing our craft.
We certify ourselves.

Some people took the discussions to the hotel bar, while others decided to dance the night away. I think I even spotted some genuine limbo-ing on the dancefloor. Someone ought to tell these testers about risk…

To be continued… Day 4